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WASHOE SEASONS OF LIFE; A NATIVE AMERICAN STORY

Author: Karen Wallis and Diane Domiteaux

Illustrator: Lea Saling

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Publisher: Creative Minds Press, Beagle Bay Books,

Material: hard cover

Summary: Traditionally, Indian tribes moved their camps in concert with the seasons. This allowed them to sow, gather, and store food; collect furs and pelts for winter; meet with other tribes; and celebrate. In this book, the reader tags along with Mele and Toso as they and their tribe, the Carson Valley Washoe, progress through the seasons of one year. Mele and Toso learn a lot from parents and elders and share it with you. This is a fictionalized account of the traditions of a Native American tribe.

Type of Reading: bedtime story, independent reading, read aloud book, learning to read

Recommended Age: read together: 6 to 9; read yourself: 10 and Up

Interest Level: 7 to 12

Age of Child: Teen STAR Review Team, Be the Star You Are!™

Young Reader Reaction: I liked that each page listed the English nouns in italics and the Washoe language and then the English meaning in a box at the bottom of each page. The story helps you understand the different cultures that lived in Lake Tahoe before the white man arrived. Children would learn about the tribes strong work ethic and the role of the extended family. The story creates an educational book. A child could read the book alone but the reader would need an adult to help interpret the Washoe language with the pronunciation guide in the back of the book. The illustrations are beautiful and young children would love to look at the book to admire Tahoe’s beauty and understand what the Washoe tribe looked like. This is a book for students in the third through fifth grades. It should be held in a library because it is more of a educational story than one you would buy as a gift.

Adult Reader Reaction: The story is wholesome. The characters are believable. The illustrations are extraordinary.

Pros: The story is wholesome. The characters are believable. The illustrations are extraordinary.

Cons: There is graphic violence related to hunting in this book.

Borrow or Buy: Borrow. The book is more appropriate for the school library or the classroom library in which Indians and their culture are studied. If there is a young reader seriously interested in Native American culture and tradition, you might consider buying this one.

If You Liked This Book, Try: BLOOD ON THE WIND; THE MEMOIRS OF FLYING HORSE MOLIE A YAMPA UTE   ALL OUR RELATIVES: TRADITIONAL NATIVE AMERICAN THOUGHTS ABOUT NATURE   THE LOST FEATHER

Educational Themes: There is a lot to be learned about tribal culture and customs. The story describes how the Indian tribes organized their annual migrations according to the season of the year. Tribes were generally tight knit. They respected the land, as well as the flora and fauna. Every person had task or function to perform.

Literary Categories: fiction - history, cultures and tradition, Native Americans, picture book

Date(s) Reviewed: April 2007

Other Reviews:




                 

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