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SID THE SCIENCE KID: WHY DID MY ICE POP MELT?

Author: Susan Korman

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Publisher: HarperFestival, an Imprint of HarperCollins Publishers,

Material: paperback

Summary: Sid the Science Kid left his ice pop on the table. The next time he sees it (morning) it has melted. He asks his parents, his friends at preschool, and his teacher why this happens. He learns about melting, freezing, and reversible change. This is a picture book based on the Television show.

Type of Reading: playtime reading, read aloud book, learning to read, developing reader, interactive reading

Recommended Age: read together: 3 to 6; read yourself: 7 to 9

Interest Level: 4 to 8

Reading Level: 2

Age of Child: Read with two brothers ages 4 and 6.

Young Reader Reaction: My kids have watched Sid the Science Kid several times, so they are familiar with this character and his personality. They liked the book and enjoyed learning about the melting-freezing process. They asked, so we read it several times.

Adult Reader Reaction: I liked the book, but I am a science nut so it is easy to make me happy when science is involved. If you are familiar with the TV show, this is a great way to reinforce the concepts without watching more TV than necessary. Children who have seen the TV show will be more familiar with the layout of the storyline, but this book could definitely be read, understood and enjoyed by those who have NOT seen the TV series.

Pros: The story It describes the melting/freezing process well for this audience (4 to 6). The extension activities to build on the science concepts are easy to figure out and do.

Cons: Because the book is based on the TV series, some of the story relies on having the background exposure to the characters.

Borrow or Buy: Borrow, at least. This is a good book, and one to read over and over. If your child is excited about science, this is a great book to feed that curiosity. However, the level of understanding in this book is right for a 4-5 year old and they will quickly want more.

If You Liked This Book, Try: SID THE SCIENCE KID: EVERYBODY MOVE YOUR FEET!   ADVENTURES OF RILEY: AMAZON RIVER RESCUE (Riley's World Series®)   DENISE'S MOLD

Educational Themes: For the energetic parent or teacher who wants to extend the lesson off the page, there are two activities the kids do that could be repeated: freezing juice into ice pops (it takes time!), and melting a big block of ice that has fresh fruit (berries, bananas, etc) frozen into it -- how can we make it melt faster (pouring warm water over it!). You can also focus in on Sid's methods of asking questions (i.e., the scientific process)

Notes: The publisher donated a copy of this book knowing that we would consider it for review and provide an independent, unbiased profile. This book will be given to a nonprofit to help readers in need.

Literary Categories: Fiction - picture book series, science, interactive learning

Date(s) Reviewed: March 2012

Other Reviews: See Critics Reviews at barnesandnoble.com; and reader feedback at amazon.com.




                 

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